Posts made in June, 2017

Teaching Immigrants Requires More than Tutors

Posted by on Jun 16, 2017 in News |

Teaching Immigrants Requires More than Tutors: Stories of Justice   Sister Barbara Dreher and Associate Kay Barnes Lend Expertise to English Tutoring Project   by Sister Mary Flick, justice coordinator from Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet – St. Louis Province March 3, 2017   While immigration has captured the nation’s attention in recent months, the Sisters of St. Joseph have been reaching out to the newest of neighbors throughout their history. For some, that “reach” happens close to home through work on the board of the English Tutoring Project (ETP) in St. Louis. ETP has been providing on-site English language tutoring to children from immigrant and refugee families since 1998, with the coordinated efforts of 17 congregations of women religious in the area. Sister Barbara Dreher has served on its board of directors since 2008, and Associate Kay Barnes has been lending her expertise as a development professional since 2014. Together, they have made visible the CSJs’ love of God and the dear neighbor without distinction. Expanding Hope, Making a ‘Little Difference’ Sister Barbara Dreher was executive director of advancement for the St. Louis province when she was invited to serve on the ETP board in 2008. Since then, she has been its chair and vice-chair. More than warming a seat, she brings her keen eye in seeing opportunities to invite donors to join the work, and her large heart for teaching children. Sister Barbara has years of experience as a fundraiser for Fontbonne University, and as provincial of the St. Louis province. She currently serves on the congregational leadership team. But she considers her early years as a CSJ teaching first grade, to be one of her best experiences of ministry. “They [the students] look you straight in the eye and beg you to teach them how to be who they are,” she says. The chance to help children succeed in school and beyond was motivation for her to become involved in the English Tutoring Project. The program began with “retired” sisters teaching in a donated RV that was driven between participating schools. Today, the English language tutoring program works with immigrant and refugee students on-site at seven Catholic grade schools in St. Louis city, county, and St. Charles county. Twenty women religious and one laywoman “retired” from classroom teaching serve as tutors. In the 2015-16 school year, their classrooms included 156 students from 20 countries who spoke 22 native languages. The program, Sister Barbara says, “encourages and supports children of immigrant and refugee families to become a part of their community. And the students go home and speak English, helping their parents to learn. “When I step back and look at who we are as CSJs – how we turn beyond ourselves to serve a world in need, that we are to do all that woman is capable of, that we are serving the dear neighbor – the English Tutoring Project is an opportunity once again to be of service, and expands my hope of making...

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St. Louis women religious team up to teach children

Posted by on Jun 14, 2017 in News |

St. Louis women religious team up to teach children

St. Louis women religious team up to teach children by Caitlin Kerfin in Global Sisters Report June 8, 2017 St. Joseph Sr. Sarah Heger, principal of Marian Middle School in St. Louis, walks the school’s halls with familiarity, greeting girls as she passes, occasionally popping in to check out the creative work they’re doing during the final hour of the school day. The Catholic all-girls school was formed through a collaborative endeavor among St. Louis’ women religious, and the founders’ work is reflected in the encouraging drawings and messages that students have painted on the walls. Teamwork among 17 congregations of women religious in the St. Louis area became an official nonprofit, the St. Louis Area Women Religious Collaborative Ministries, in 1998. The collaborative was formed out of an initiative from Region 10 of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious, a national group of sister leaders. The women wanted to see what needs they could tackle together, said Sr. Kathleen Koenen, a School Sister of Notre Dame. The first need identified was education for immigrant or refugee children, which led to the creation of the collaborative’s English Tutoring Project. The program, which started in 1998, helps children from refugee and immigrant families learn English on-site at their school. “No one congregation felt at that time they could keep starting new ministries to fulfill new needs because many of the religious communities that were in the Leadership Conference of Women Religious were getting smaller in this area or had many ministries they were already involved in,” said Koenen, director of the English Tutoring Project. “But if they could collaborate with each other, they might be able to meet a need.” READ ENTIRE...

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